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only be tried in federal court. he's never eligible for military commissions. a first year law student could convict this person. what i'm worried about is what does he know about future attacks? he's telling us that his brother was the bad guy, he's sort of just along for the ride. they had no international connections. guess what, he's down-playing his involvement. what i am suggesting is that we use the national security legal system where we can interview him without a lawyer to gather intelligence to prevent a future attack, rather than having to negotiate through his lawyer to get any information. jenna: but, if i could, senator, there seems to be a lot of discrepancy about some of the information come being out about this investigation. >> right. jenna: we've all seen it, you know, played out on the news and otherwise. i would like to drill down a little bit into an even change you just had about the boston terror attacks with the s*epbg o secretary of home land security january elt napolitano. we showed an older brother, this tkhaou owe, that is secretary napolitano. we just sh
system of justice. under u.s. law, the united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions, and it is important to remember that since 9/11 we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> dzhokhar tsarnaev and his brother originally born in kyrgyzstan charged. tamerlan tsarnaev is dead after a shootout with police, dzhokhar has a gunshot wound to his neck after police apprehended him friday night. a source with firsthand knowledge of the investigation tells cnn that dzhokhar tar neve is on a breathing ventilator and heavily sedated. as we talk about the suspects' future, we cannot forget about those who lost their lives. let's take time to recall them, chris tell krystle campbell, 8-year-old martin richard whose mom and sister were greefsly wounded and 23 year ode linzie lu a boston university graduate student from china. and then of course m.i.t. officer gunned down, 26-year-old sean collier. we're told vice president biden will attend a memorial service for him on wednesday. as we mentioned, dzhokhar tsarnaev won't be charged as
in boston as an scuse because our law toughens i think things up. >> the senate bill would have multiple background chengs and make sure anyone over-staying a visa would be detected. right now, there is no check on airport departures. as for those who came without visas, lindsay graham says this. >> now is the time to bring all the 11 million out of the shadows and find out who they are. most of them are here to work. but wree may find some terrorists in our midst who, have been hiding in the shadows, when it comes to the entry/exit. the 19 hijackers were all student who is overstayed their visas and the system didn't capture that. >> the senate holds the second two of hearings on immigration reform tomorrow. >> it will be very interesting. an emotional ballgame in beston last night, after a week of terror. >> shannon: a yesterday's home game was made more special by neil diamond, who made it there on the red-eye. members of law enforcement, first responders and marathon participants were also honored. david ortiz had a passionate rally cry. >> it doesn't say red sox, it says boston... w
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. underu.s. law, the united states citizens can not be tried rather in military commissions. martha: but house armed services commission buck mckeown argues that the white house should reconsider. he says, quote, it seems premature to declare that we will not treat tsarnaev as an enemy combatant since we don't know about his affiliations. clearly american citizens must be tried to civilian court, but the same citizen viciously attacked his countrymen, should be exploited for his intelligence value before any trial begins. that will be a debate that rages on for some time on this issue. we'll talk more later in the show with former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. bill: looking forward to that coming up here. meanwhile the feds want to talk to the widow of the suspect, tamerlan. she is mother of 3-year-old daughter between the two. the her lawyer said talks are underway with the feds how to proceed with that. he revealed on the last day tamerlan was home when his wife left for work. martha: well the officers who capturedded dzhokh
of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's what they are. if you make them into sort of a bigger deal than he is or anyone is, it sort of gives them a relevance we actually don't want to. so a lot of people in national security and counterterrorism love this idea. not only because of the legal underpinnings behind it but also because it sort of says to anyone who would harm us, you're just a criminal. >> there has also been a lot of successful prosecutions of terrorist suspects in criminal court. >> you can learn a lot of evidence from this. when i first got into this field it was right after the africa bombings, african embassy bombings in '98, and some of the
and therefore the younger brother is going to be able to relay that to law enforcement or are they going to continue these sort of dark patches where we have questions that will never be answered. >> last about the latest incident. two men in canada that apparently wanted to derail a train from canada probably headed to the u.s. they are identified as having support from al qaeda in iran. >> right. >> a lot of threads here. do they make sense to you? >> they don't make sense to me. that doesn't mean they aren't true. but as we've learned this week. as we've learned in the past, we should always be cautious about the early reports. one thing the canadian mounted police said there is no state sponsor. even if there is an al qaeda link it's not iran supporting attack. and it makes no sense what iran is doing. we're in negotiations. they're about to have a presidential campaign. this is not the way iran tens to operate. of course al qaeda and injury. she vows to dance again and run in the boston marathon. this is what she had to say to cnn's anderson cooper. >> i landed and was -- sort of cl
will release that videotape in a court of law. they've described it in extensive detail. that's going to be powerful, powerful evidence in a potential trial. tom, thanks very much. let's recap quickly the surviving suspect, dzhokhar tsarnaev, now facing federal charges, among them use gd and conspiring to 0 use a weapon of mass destruction rulgting in death. let's bring in our senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. jeffrey, what happens next? >> what happens next is that the case will be presented to a grand jury. prosecutors will begin presenting evidence, leading to an indictment. i think the process is going to slow down a great deal. remember, this crime was only a week ago. the government is going to have to assemble a lot of scientific evidence trying to tie material that could be connected to the defendant, to the bomb itself. this is complicated stuff. i think it's going to be months in the grand jury until a final indictment is ready to be presented probably. and then at that point the case will be presented to a trial judge, and there will be motions and then a trial. >> he no
themselves from their now-deceased son-in-law, saying something to the effect he was a monster they never knew. how -- how are her parents dealing with this? >> they are taking it very hard. you know, the dad came out to get the trash last night, and pretty much said no comment. you can see it's taking a heavy toll on the family. you know, katherine glup the suburbs of providence. raised christian, went to college in boston, met tamerlan. she converted to islam, and by all accounts, fairly devout, wore the hajaab, the traditional head scarf. she didn't speak russian, so she wasn't always aware what was being said, she didn't understand the language being spoken around the house. wolf. >> chris lawrence reporting for us. just ahead, still many unanswered questions in the boston marathon terror attack. investigators work to interview the only suspect still alive. new insights into the investigation. stay with our special coverage. ♪ [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard
just yet. as you know, an m.i.t. law enforcement officer was, sean collier was killed on tuesday night and that murder has not been charged yet at all and we should see the state do more work on that front in the coming days and weeks, we expect. >> as you talk about going forward in all this what do we know of how the process progresses from here? there was that legal hearing on monday. what happens next? >> that was just the very beginning, a complaint was filed. he still will have to appear in court, be indicted and there is a hearing set for may 30th at 10:00 a.m. that the judge mentioned in this hearing monday morning. >> before i let you go, erin what do we know about legal defense? did he have legal representation in that hospital room? >> reporter: i have the transcript of the court hearing here there is controversy on friday and over the weekend about him not being mirandized. they went through it twice today and offered the use of an attorney and the one word he spoke was no when asked if he could afford an attorney and he was presented with defense attorneys today. >>> we wa
filmed here earlier on the week, seen him on the news for the first time. and then for son-in-law reason, he tells me this is dzhokhar and tamerlan, and points at the screen and says here is tamerlan in the blue jacket and dzhokhar in the white jacket. and i say anzor, these are guys with the backpack when the photos are shown. it can't be them. he says i don't know, these are my children. and then his wife grabs the tv screen and starts screaming, i can't be, it can't be happening. i don't believe it. the children are dead. i would have cried out myself. >> reporter: nick walsh, cnn. >>> it was russia that asked the fbi to look into tamerlan tsarnaev's activities back in 2011. moscow said the older brother was increasingly turning to radical islam. bill black joins us now live from moscow where it is 9:36 in the morning. phil, the chronology of this may surprise people, because it seems that the return to radical islam, the request from moscow came before he traveled back to his ancestral homeland. is that the word you're hearing from russian officials, that they were worried even befor
in connection with the attack. abc's dan harris is in boston. >> reporter: law enforcement sources tell abc news the young man seen on the surveillance tape, calmly walking through the crowd with a bomb in his bag, is now being cooperative with investigators. he has trouble speaking because of gunshot wounds to his neck, but he is communicating through writing, nodding his head and making short vocalizations. based on what he has told them, investigators are now convinced there are no more ongoing plots. and abc news has learned dzhokhar tsarnaev told investigators they learned to build a bomb on the internet. dzhokhar tsarnaev was officially charged with using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction. the complaint contains vivid new details about the chaotic events of last thursday night when the brothers tsarnaev allegedly carjacked a man. the victim describes one of the brothers getting in the car and saying, did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. the victim says the brother then removed a magazine from his gun, displayed a bullet and said, i am serious. the victim la
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13